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THE DANGERS OF LOW-FAT, HIGH CARBOHYDRATE DIETS
ON CARDIOVASCULAR HEART DISEASE  

Cholesterol is not a deadly poison, but a substance vital to the cells of all mammals. There are no such things as good or bad cholesterol, but mental stress, physical activity and change of body weight may influence the level of blood cholesterol. A high cholesterol is not dangerous by itself, but may reflect an unhealthy condition, or it may be totally innocent.
Uffe Ravnskov, M.D., Ph.D.
http://www.ravnskov.nu/cholesterol.htm


The best diet for a healthy heart is high-fat (animal fat not vegetable oil), low-carbohydrate because:
"In this study we compared the effects of variations in dietary fat and carbohydrate (CHO) content on concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins". . . "The diets contained, as a percentage of total calories, either 60% CHO, 25% fat, and 15% protein, or 40% CHO, 45% fat, and 15% protein." "The 60% CHO diet resulted in higher fasting plasma triglycerides (206 50 vs 113 19 mg/dl, p = 0.03), cholesterol (15 6 vs 6 1 mg/dl,
p = 0.005), triglyceride (56 25 vs
16 3 mg/dl, p = 0.003), and lower HDL cholesterol (39 3 vs 44 3 mg/dl,
p = 0.003) concentrations, without any change in LDL cholesterol concentration." "Given the atherogenic potential of these changes in lipoprotein metabolism, it seems appropriate to question the wisdom of recommending that all Americans should replace dietary saturated fat with CHO."
American Journal of Cardiology
2000; 85: 45-4

"Low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets [15% protein, 60% carb, 25% fat] increase the risk of heart disease in post-menopausal women."
American Journal of Clinical
Nutrition 1997; 65: 1027-33

"More plagues than heart disease can be laid at sugar's door. A survey of medical journals in the 1970's produced findings implicating sugar as a causative factor in kidney disease, liver disease, shortened life-span, increased desire for coffee and tobacco, as well as atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease."
Enzyme Nutrition. Avery Publishing Group Inc, 1985
NOTE: The digestion does not distinguish between sugar and starch (BAG)
"Intake of margarine may predispose to development of CHD in men."
Circulation 1995; 91: 925
"Intakes of fat, saturated fat, and monosaturated fat were associated with reduced risk of ischemic stroke in men." "In our data intakes of fat and type of fat were not related to the incidence of the combined outcome of all cardiovascular diseases or to total or cardiovascular mortality."
Journal of the American Medical
Association 1997; 78: 2145-2150

There is no evidence that too much animal fat and cholesterol in the diet promotes atherosclerosis or heart attacks. For instance, more than a dozen studies have shown that people who have had a heart attack haven't eaten more fat than other people, and degree of atherosclerosis at autopsy is unrelated with the diet.
Uffe Ravnskov, M.D., Ph.D.
http://www.ravnskov.nu/cholesterol.htm


"The most striking feature of the table is that the losses appear to be inversely proportionate to the carbohydrate content of the food. Where the carbohydrate intake is low the rate of loss in weight is greater and conversely."
Quarterly Journal of Medicine
1932; 1: 331-52

"Low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets [15% protein, 60% carb, 25% fat] increase the risk of heart disease in post-menopausal women.".
American Journal of Clinical
Nutrition 1997; 65: 1027-33
George Mann, now retired, was previously a professor in medicine and biochemistry at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee. After the start of the cholesterol campaign Mann summarized his criticism of the diet-heart idea in Nutrition Today. . According to Mann, the diet-heart idea is "the greatest scientific deception of our times". Mann is especially critical of the cholesterol-lowering trials. "Never in the history of science have so many costly experiments failed so consistently", he declared.
Uffe Ravnskov, M.D., Ph.D.
http://www.ravnskov.nu/cholesterol.htm
"Moreover, recent findings in a US population, among 350,000 MRFIT screenees followed 6 years, bear on this idea (of increased stroke and cerebral haemorrhage risk with lowered cholesterol). In that study, there was a sixfold excess risk of death from cerebral haemorrhage in middle-aged men having total serum cholesterol levels lower than 160 mg/dl and also elevated BP."
Circulation 1989; 79 (3): 718-20.
"More plagues than heart disease can be laid at sugar's door. A survey of medical journals in the 1970's produced findings implicating sugar as a causative factor in kidney disease, liver disease, shortened life-span, increased desire for coffee and tobacco, as well as atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease."
Enzyme Nutrition. Avery Publishing
Group Inc, 1985
NOTE: The digestion does not distinguish between sugar and starch (BAG)
"Medical Research Council survey showed that men eating butter ran half the risk of developing heart disease as those using margarine."
Nutrition Week 1991; 21(12): 2-3
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