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MISINFORMATION ABOUT VITAMIN C


21 September 2004

As usual the self proclaimed (more like self serving) mainstream authorities are so deathly afraid of vitamin C that they continue to disseminate all sorts of rubbish on it. Not realizing how stupid they look to anyone who even knows a smidgen about this king of vitamins should laugh at their ineptness of the most basic understanding let alone their authority on it. WHAT A JOKE!

Sadly this is not funny when one sees how these professional scamers continue to pray on the trusting public to promote toxic and in many cases infective drugs...

See also:

Illegal Medical System Made Legal

THE VITAMIN C FANATICS WERE RIGHT ALL ALONG

Chris Gupta
http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/chris/2004/09/21/
misinformation_about_vitamin_c.htm


The Vitamin C Foundation
P. O. Box 73172 Houston, Texas 77273
1-888-443-3634 Tollfree in USA 1-281-443-3634 EveryWhere
1-630-416-1309 Fax
Owen R. Fonorow, Co-founder
M. S. Till, Sr., Co-founder
Email: info@vitamincfoundation.orginfo@vitamincfoundation.org
For Release Monday, August 9, 2004 Contact: Owen Fonorow at (630) 416-1438
Email: fonorow@internetwks.com

VITAMIN C FOUNDATION RELEASES ITS LIST OF THE TOP TEN WEBSITES THAT DISSEMINATE MISINFORMATION ABOUT VITAMIN C

HOUSTON, TX- The Vitamin C Foundation released a list of the Top Ten Websites That Disseminate Misinformation About Vitamin C today. Topping the list are websites hosted by prestigious organizations such as the National Library of Medicine's "Medline Plus," the National Institutes of Health, the Mayo Clinic, Quackwatch, Consumerlab.com, WebMD and the Merck Manual.

The most often published misinformation about vitamin C is that mega-doses of this vitamin are washed away in the urine and produce nothing more than expensive urine. A recent study published by National Institutes of Health researchers dispels this belief. High oral doses of vitamin C have now been demonstrated to produce three times higher concentration in the blood plasma than previously thought possible. [Annals Internal Medicine 2004 Apr 6 ;140(7):533-7] Since 1996 the National Institutes of Health and the Institutes of Medicine have published spurious information that blood plasma saturation for vitamin C is achieved with a 200 milligram of oral dose and additional amounts are worthless.

Another mistaken but widely distributed fabrication regarding vitamin C is that 5 servings of fruits and vegetables are sufficient to provide the 200 milligrams of vitamin C recommended by the Institutes of Medicine. In fact, the most commonly consumed plant foods (iceberg lettuce, tomatoes, French fries, orange juice and onions) provide only about 110 milligrams of vitamin C, which is the typical consumption level for American adults. Furthermore, the National Cancer Institute concedes five servings of plant foods have not reduced the risk for cancer or heart disease and now recommend nine servings.

Yet another widely held misconception disseminated by various health organizations is that the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA = 75 milligrams for adult males, 90 milligrams for females and an additional 35 milligrams for smokers) is sufficient for 98 percent of the population. In fact, more than 4 in 10 Americans do not even consume the RDA levels of vitamin C. Furthermore, the RDA is misleading since it is established for healthy people only, not millions of Americans who have increased need for vitamin C (example s are smokers, pregnant women, diabetics, athletes, users of aspirin, steroids, birth control pills or estrogen, anemic and hospitalized individuals).

Among other commonly published falsehoods about vitamin C is the assertion that high-dose vitamin C causes kidney stones, that high-dose vitamin C induces iron overload, or that mega doses of vitamin C may cause DNA damage and increase the risk of cancer. These widely held beliefs and not backed by scientific investigation. [Science. 2001 Sep 14; 293:1993-5; Int J Vita min Nutr Res 1999 Mar;69:67-82; J Am Society Nephrology 1999 Apr;10:840-5; Nutrition Reviews 1999 Mar;57:71-7; Clin Chem Laboratory Medicine. 1998 Mar;36:143-7; Annals Nutrition Metabolism. 1997;41:269-82]

A more detailed list of the misinformation about vitamin C that is published by various health organizations can be found at www.vitamincfoundation.org. ###


THE TOP TEN WEBSITES THAT DISSEMINATE MISINFORMATION ABOUT VITAMIN C
Detailed Information


http://www.newmediaexplorer.org/chris/

List information is at: http://tinyurl.com/2xohw

 

 
 
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