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PROTEIN LINKED TO MEMORY LOSS


Thanks Kent, for your comments. I do not work @ UWO. I write these on the
fly and sometimes, late at night, am thinking more of sleeping than what I
am doing, You are of course right and the article refers to a specific
compound (PP1), that is not the same as eating of protein. I should have
pointed that out that too.

Have you read Dr. Jan Kwasniewski's "Homo Optimus" book? His main concern
seems to be that too much protein will end up turning into sugar in the
liver and generate insulin. He makes a number of comments which are not
referenced but by in large the book is very interesting. If you have read
the book, do you know anything about the selective currents he refers to?

Chris Gupta

At 05:41 PM 29/09/2002 -0400, you wrote:
In a message dated 9/28/02 8:54:23 PM Mountain Daylight Time,
mbgupta@uwo.ca writes:


Here is another advantage of the lower protein in Dr. Jan Kwasniewski's
Optimum diet as apposed to the high protein in Atkin's diet.


Hi Chris,

I was curious about your position at the University of Western Ontario?

Your conclusion about PP1 protein effecting memory and the high protein
Atkin's diet is very questionable.

1. The body breaks down all ingested protein in the diet into amino acids
and then uses these amino acids for various purposes included building new
proteins in the body. The link between PP1 protein and eating meat was not
discussed in the article and I doubt any connection.

2. Having one's long term memory erased just to improve the short term
memory lost in elderly is highly questionable. I don't think older people
would like their childhood and mid-life memories erased just to be able to
remember someone's phone number. See quote from article:

"PP1 has a role in a complex clearing system that wipes away insignificant
details that could clog the brain, leaving a cleaner slate for new learning."

There has been a strong connection between Alzheimer's disease and vitamin
B-12 deficiency. We know that vitamin B-12 is found almost exclusively in
meat and the Atkins high protein diet would be better for older people to
prevent Alzheimer's disease. Older people generally reduce their meat
intake, especially women. Check out Dr. Mercola's web page at:

http://www.mercola.com/2001/may/19/alzheimers.htm

Sincerely,

Kent R. Rieske
http://www.biblelife.org/vitamins.htm


Here is another advantage of the lower protein in Dr. Jan Kwasniewski's
Optimum diet as apposed to the high protein in Atkin's diet.

http://www.xpresssites.com/lee/madison/XpSpecialSections/
ourtime/story_354885.asp

Chris Gupta


At 05:41 PM 29/09/2002 -0400, you wrote:
There has been a strong connection between Alzheimer's disease and vitamin
B-12 deficiency. We know that vitamin B-12 is found almost exclusively in
meat and the Atkins high protein diet would be better for older people to
prevent Alzheimer's disease. Older people generally reduce their meat
intake, especially women. Check out Dr. Mercola's web page at:

http://www.mercola.com/2001/may/19/alzheimers.htm

Hi Kent,

Here is an interesting methodology of dealing with and checking Vitamin B12
deficiency. This method uses DMSO to absorb, of the shelf, B12 form health
food stores into the body. See

http://www.krysalis.net/b12.htm

Chris Gupta

 

 
 
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